WVAC 911—Lessons from EMS: Safety First

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What do you imagine is the No. 1 priority for an Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)?

When I ask people this question, most guess that it is taking care of the patient. While patient care is our job, our top priority is always our own safety. Following in close second is the safety of our partner.

This may seem contradictory to what you imagine for the job. Most people imagine that EMTs ...

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File of Life

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When a Wilton Volunteer Ambulance Corps (WVAC) crew is dispatched to a 911 call, the first things the crew seeks to understand about their patient upon arrival are: a list of medications taken, an accurate medical history, existing conditions and allergies. Often the WVAC crew responds to a patient where this information is not readily available and critical time is spent to gather this information. Once it is gathered, the crew can then use the information in ...

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Understanding Head Injuries

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With winter ski season now in full swing, and spring bike riding right around the corner, the Wilton Volunteer Ambulance Corps (WVAC) would like to remind the community about head injuries and the importance of wearing helmets. A head injury is any trauma to the scalp, skull, or brain. The injury may be only a minor bump on the skull or can be a serious brain injury.

On our various EMS calls, we see many patients with concern ...

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Sniffing Out a Medical Emergency Isn’t Just for the Dogs

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Every now and then there is a news story about a pet dog that is praised as a hero for alerting his owner to her undiagnosed cancer.  In addition, service dogs are trained to detect and warn their owners of an impending seizure, heart attack, high blood sugar, blood pressure problems, fainting, and asthma, just to name a few.  If only humans could smell the tell-tale signs of a medical emergency and summon help. Did you know ...

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WVAC 911: Sepsis Killed Kermit

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After complaining of a sore throat only two days prior, on May 15, 1990, famed puppeteer Jim Henson woke up at 2am; he was having trouble breathing, and was coughing up blood. Henson agreed to go to the New York Hospital two hours later, and by the time he got there he couldn’t breathe on his own. He had abscesses in his lungs. After two cardiac arrests, he died the morning of May 16, 1990 at age ...

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